how to be a rescuer

“A drowning person doesn’t rescue herself.” -Julie Schumacker

Talk about inspiring, did you see the story last week about the family at the Panama City Beach that was carried out by a riptide and were desperately in need of being rescued? Check out this link and be sure to look at the video.

Two boys on boogie boards were pulled into a riptide that took them about 100 yards from shore. When their parents and other family members and then bystanders tried to rescue them, all ten ended up in deep water and in danger of drowning.

Another strategy was needed, so people decided to form a human chain of 80 people — yes, 80 — that almost reached the desperate group. Then two strong swimmers covered the rest of the distance and one by one passed each person down the human chain to safety. No one drowned, though the grandmother of the boys suffered a heart attack.

Isn’t that incredible? All those people, many who did not know the family at all, from different races and faiths and ways of life, cooperated and coordinated with no dissent, no questions, to put their own lives at risk to save this family.

It’s true that “A drowning person doesn’t rescue herself.” We all need each other. We need people who do not dilly-dally or close their eyes but who courageously dive in and do what is necessary.

Wouldn’t you like to see our nation repeat this compassionate act for those who are so in need of being rescued, those who are impoverished and without jobs and victims of prejudice? Are there ways we can form a human chain of kindness to reach out to those who are desperate for help and hope? Maybe that should be our starting point in national conversations.

Have you rescued anyone — or been rescued — lately?

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